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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
a poll in frons show those in the uk would prefer to leave the eu. we are waiting on the results from italy's latest debt auction. it will be two years of a zero coupon and five years of an italian linked paper. we'll get the results coming up in just a moment. here is a check of the european markets. we have seen them particular to the upside. now with the exception of spain trying to fight back into the green this morning, bolstered basically by the general risk on attitude. perhaps some of the credit flows, some of the equity fund flows boosting stock markets around the world. here is a look at who is leading the index this morning. onte paschi is on the top of the board, up 6.35%. today it's continued to snap back on hopes of.continued investor returnings. asml, elements which help make computer chips is up about 4%. it has been upgraded. it's viewed as a winner here in the mobile phone wars as more continue to shift to that market. sbm offshore, peugeot, tnt express towards top of the pack. at the bottom, it's a different story. down 3.5% o a downgrade, some other companies there
of there being a straight referendum on being an in/out referendum, part of the eu, not part of the eu, which is mixed from where most people think they are. >> some of the surveys show the people becoming more worried about it and we saw those comments, what's his face, labor leader over the weekend saying that he's walking out of the eurozone. so clearly, he finds that there's political gain to be made from -- >> and then you saw this british train commerce survey, just 26% of them wanted to keep the status quo, right? >> i thought this was extraordinary. i was surprises how low it is. in this survey, when you ask businesses about how much in favor they are of keeping things the same, only 24%. >> 59% wanted a looser relationship with the eurozone. most people would say, we want to stay part of the eu, but we would like to have far less regulation, far less judgments than just have been contemplated from the european court. >> is britain going to be able to say that where they get rid of the regulation and teen the market and all that? >> that's the number one question. >> and we will explo
of a couple in the last year to syria when the e.u.'s embargo changed, the provisions of that changed and so, i think those are advantages. >> thank you. >> mike gates. >> can you confirm in the case of an agreement between the u.k. and another government perhaps some kind of defense cooperation that doesn't have the same status as the, where we are talking about restrictions or controls on the arms exports that are purchased from british companies or exported from this country? in other words, if the mod decides to transfer equipment to another state that wouldn't be subjected to the same criteria as would apply with regards to the armed export regime? . . >> if you have further information; that would be helpful. okay. that's fine. can i ask you about the review as regards the workload that you referred to for ministers, the number of items for consideration: you said thorough overseeing of ministers went up 235 this year compared to 153 last year and 39 in the previous year before your middle east and north africa review. >> right. >> this is presumably dealt with by the human rights sect
eu joins us from beijing with more of the details. eunice, there have been questions about china's reliability in data. over the past couple of years. >> there's always a big question about that. in fact, goldman sachs and ubs were some of the brokerages that came out recently questioning the latest december numbers for the export figures. they were concerned that the export numbers reported by china didn't seem to match the export data from its trading partners and the slow at some of the ports. that was raising questions. the chinese officials came out and defended the numbers and said that the numbers were all well and good. there is so much skepticism about that. the trade data was looking as though it was very much in flux. however, when you take a look at those in isolation, it raises a lot of question marks. but in terms of going forward, how you read these data points, most economists say you have to look at them as guidelines. this is a developing economy. so in terms of guidelines, the latest figures that we saw for 2012 in terms of gdp or for industrial output and ever
results in europe look set for a change. the eu muniea explains his investigation into the search engine. he's convinced google is profiting by diverting internet traffic for certain businesses. >>> american skres announced better-than-expected earnings for the fourth quarter. it saw revenues of $8.4 had billion. it will make big restructuring changes which includes 5,400 job cuts throughout the quarter. shares dipped in extended hours of trading the. >>> and the fate of superman remains firmly with warner brothers and dc comics after a decision from a california court. the court of appeals said that the rights for the man of appeals should not stay with the cocreators. the decision means that warner can release this summer's new superman reboot without fear of legal challenges. so we're watching today. who is your favorite hee roar? superman, ironman, super mario draghi? whoever you like, e-mail us, tweet us. my produces asked me who i thought my favorite super hero was. it took my a while to think about it, but then i thought hong kong fooey. there you go. many happy memories. talking
.s. and e.u. at the same time, i think we need to be realistic. i was -- [inaudible] what was that? over ten years ago, and i think there were unnecessarily optimistic views about how quickly it could be done and uncomplicated it was. it turned out that caution was better part of judgment. i think they would have to be willing essentially to open up the markets and not use various procedures to try to safeguard their market. so i favor proceedings, but with an understanding that there are immense issues to be looked at. and it's not going happen very, very quickly. i'm in favor of starting it. [inaudible] it's fancy language for -- regulations. whether allow european -- to you see opportunities to streamline the way the two economies governor themselves? >> it's the latter. let me put it this way. we have dealt with the issues regarding safeguards, safeguards and others with ore countries. we did that in negotiation with colombia. we did that in negotiations with panama. if any two entities resolve those issues, it's the e.u. and united states. essentially what the e.u. has been doing, in my
by manipulating internet searches. the e.u. says its probe continues. if found guilty, the search giant could be fined billions of dollars. and it's an etf free-for-all. exchange traded funds are becoming the investor's choice over mutual funds. data for the first 11 months of last year show 10's of billions of dollars more were poured into the lower-fee funds. nearly $120 billion was taken out of stock funds, while etfs' total amount climbed to $154 billion. it was a banner week for the first week of the year. is dan haugh of pti securities cashing in and heading to hawaii? > > well, it seems that way. we certainly had a good week. the iwm, the russell 2000, went up 5 3/4% in a four day week. so that is a pretty good week last week. > were you a little surprised at the gains, particularly after the thursday softness in the markets? > > really when you had the activity in washington finally being somewhat resolved, even though the majority of it, most of the negative things are to- be-continued, you knew that there was going to be a relief rally of some sort. but realistically, this has gone
between the u.s. and the e.u.. at the same time, i think we need to be realistic. i was at doha -- what was that, over ten years ago? and i think there were unnecessarily optimistic views about how quickly it could be done and how uncomplicated it was. and it turned out that caution was the better part of judgment. the e.u. has immense regulatory issues, and i think they would have to be willing, essentially, to open up their markets and not use various procedures to try to safeguard their market. so, um, i favor proceeding but with an understanding that there are immense issues to be, to be looked at. and it's not going to happen very, very quickly. but i'm in fave of starting it -- i'm in favor of starting it. >> [inaudible] nontariff trade barriers which is just simply fancy language for, you know -- >> exactly. >> -- for regulations, you know, whether we're going to allow european feeds that might be con -- needs that might be contaminated with mad cow disease, and they have the same concerns. inevitably out of that is going to come a reconfiguration of the regulatory safety net on
to hopkinson said this water tastes funny and hopkins said of course it does, it's got a whiskey in it. its e.u. a judge of water. last night and then, you know, he would do these things like -- off in odd note to winston churchill essay deerwood then, happy for dave. how old are you anyway? that's the kind of guy he was. there is another dinner at claridge is in the west end of london and period was hosted by the leaders of the british press, the publishers, the editors, the distinguished writers. churchill wasn't there. hopkins was the guest of honor. and so that journalists would do the lake and what he said that he was asked to make some after dinner remarks and he went around the table, speaking softly, looking at a set, shiny and 86. he gave them the sons that while america was not yet in the war, she was marching to save them in the british old. and then one of the journalists wrote, we are happy then all. her courage and confidence have been stimulated by a contact, which shakespearean henry the fifth had a phrase, a little touch of harry mma. the hopkins touches not know, nor was it la
.s. china and e.u. posted strong economic data, all of that news lifted oil futures 72 crepts settling at 95.95 a barrel. kerry gave little hints about the pipelines today. he was asked about the initial approval in the confirmation hearing, and he said, quote, i'll make the appropriate judgment on the pipeline after the state department completes its review. natural gas output resumes at the site of the hostage crisis in the next few days, but not returning to full capacity for another month. all right. up next, worst state ever. a woman hooks up with a guy through match.com, and then he tries to kill her. now she's suing match for $10 million. is this a legal game changer for the online dating industry which is huge? we've got details. plus, some chicago and new york city officials rake in so much overtime pay that is dwarfs their actual salaries. it is so ridiculous it's bringing together me and the guy who i disagree with on basically everything. how can it be stopped? stay there for more "money." ♪ look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels.
. in the u.k., this big e.u. debate about how important is european trade in the future, as well. you've also been speaking to the prime minister of latvia. what does he have to say? >> reporter:. latvia is a poster child, isn't it, for those on the right economically if you like who think that austerity and paying dunn your debts is the way that you restore growth. latvia had a very difficult crisis. they had negative growth and a contraction of the economy of somewhere around 20%. last year, they grew 5%. this year they're expected to grow 3.5%. and that's because they front loaded a lot of the cuts in government spending, and they forced down wage rates. i caught up with the latvian prime minister earlier this morning on "squawk box" and said, well, you've done it, greece, spain, italy, portugal, perhaps they should be learning lessons from you. let's listen to how he responded. >> i wouldn't go as far as now to tell exactly other countries what should be -- what they should be doing because each country has its own difficulties and its own way out of the crisis. but in general, we see tha
. i want you to react. start with number 10, that eu structural problems we main unresolved. when i first heard that, i don't think they will be unresolved. you're right, the market has bid things it's looking like the world is better. >> last year, all the european markets were up and europe was in a semi-recession and all the european markets were up semi-20% and i have them down this year in reaction. >> what about the euro? >> euro is relative to the dollar. ecb expanding the money supply and fedex spanding money supply. it's a race to the bottom. i don't know who will win it but i don't think there will be much change to the euro. >> i don't think euro ever resolves this issue, does enough to put them off when under pressure. >> sounds familiar. >> that's the environment we're in. i do think the markets are signaling core europe and stock growing again this year, growing uf to keep the eurozone out of its recession. if that doesn't happen, markets will go down. >> the surprise component of that is the 10% decline in the various european indexes. that's what people aren't prepar
by the eu, the judge has been sanctioned by the eu. bill: he has a tough, tough reputation too this judge has, and the trial just startek. and his wife is on record as saying that everything that is coming out of there this week is a flat-out lie. what is the motivation beyond iranian media putting this word out, when in fact it's not the case. you're saying now this guy is still in jail, he's behind bars. >> he's in jail, he's facing abuse while he's in prison. and the iranian regime, the revolutionary garcia is trying to utilize the internal media to in order to tamper down any kind of global outreach that is going on media wise. what the iranians are doing through their media is no, no, no we are letting him out in a few days. meanwhile they are beating him. bill: torture. >> this is one of the worst prisons, eye rain and prisons. the media is utilizing a distortion campaign. it's called media advocacy. we are putting up the true facts, iran is distorting it to tamper down media significant in what is becoming a dangerous by the moment situation for the pastor and his family. he's 32 y
states at 1.4, which means for every dollar you cut, you ha you had e lose $1 340eu in gross domestic product. goildman sax, which is not exactly a left-wing outfit has put it close to 1.5. cut $1, lose $1.50 in gross domestic product. economists at the the university of california have found that during recessions -- and it is important -- during recessions, the fiscal multiplier in developed countries generally falls between 1.5 and 2. that complicated economic gobbledygook boils down to this: $1 in reduced government spending will reduce gross domestic product by more than $1 -- by $1 340eu or $1.70 or whatever the multiplier is, and damages the economy without accomplishing the intended deficit reduction. other countries teame attemptedt austerity -- spain, greece, and portugal particularly have persistent double-dynel i think unemployment -- double-digit unemployment, over 126% i 26% in and greece, and they have anemic or negative economic growth rates. contrast that with the u.s. where a more balanced approach to the economic crisis yielded an unemployment rate that is still far
barack obama and the eu, i think even hillary clinton would agree at this point, what difference does it make? which, by the way is going to be her campaign slogan in 2016. the nobel peace prize should go to people who risk their lives and doing heroic work and whose efforts will be magna advertised by recognition from this award. hillary clinton does not risk her life. she does not do heroic work. i have been waiting all day to hear from mr. garland nixon about what she has done for any tangible effort at peace whatsoever. >> garland, let us know? what do you think? >> a couple of things. first of all with former president clinton, if you look at the clinton foundation, they have donated upwards of $30 million to haiti since the earthquake. they have been responsible for literally millions of people getting -- in africa getting medication for h.i.v. and aids. it's hard to question the clinton foundation and what they have done. >> what about hillary? secretary clinton i should say. >> one of the important things she has done is taken the state department in a fundamentally different
the thing that differentiates the u.s. from so many of the other countries especially in the eu we know how to fix our problem, and we're just at lagerheads as to which way to go. >> reporter: but the head of the international monetary fund christine lagarde said here "the u.s. has to confront this." if those decisions are postponed again -- >> well it will be pushing the can down the road again which was the reproach that we made against the europeans and i don't think that the u.s. should fall in that trap. >> reporter: and with the u.s. economy now showing renewed strength, the feeling here is that the u.s. could help pull up the rest of the world, if washington could just get out of the way. charlie, norah? >> anthony mason thank you. >>> in the international press institute reports that 132 journalists were killed around the world last year and reporting on the war in syria is especially dangerous for westerners. more than two months ago american freelance correspondent james foley was abducted by armed gunmen and hasn't been heard from since. he's a friend of o
have reduced competition in 15 eu countries did in earnings from facebook after the market closes today. the company gains in the way from products and services. facebook expected to point to traction in mobile and ads. that is the latest from the fox business network hitting the power to prosper. making the big romantic gesture. that's powerful. verizon. get a nokia lumia 822 in red for free. ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] time and sales data. split-second stats. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ it's so close to the options floor... [ indistinct shouting, bell dinging ] ...you'll bust your brain box. ♪ all onhinkorswim from td ameritrade. ♪ cheryl: get ready, super bowl kickoff is four days away and that means the most anticipated commercial of the year are upon us. here with a first look at the commercials they will be talking about, but it's always great to see you. i feel like we have a super bowl date you and i. so you are doing it again, another year of user generated commercials. last year you give away how much money? >> $2 million. the newspaper and the online. u
. you made a great point here, it is highly contagious, it's more contagious than the tphrao*eu. another thing it has in common with the flu is it changes rapidly it mutates. this year's strain is not the same as last year's strain. when you have a new strain you get twice as many cases. this is a very problematic thing. it's going to spread all over the country. i want the people out there to distinguish the symptoms. if you're feeling the vomiting, nausea, the diarrhea this is the n o noro virus. bill: you say it starts in utah. >> it's having huge out breaks in nursing homes and churches in utah. my guess is that somebody flew over from england or wales to utah bringing it there. plane flights spreads this incredibly rapidly. bill: if that is the case you have to wash your hands, man, that is your defense number one is it not? >> right, the flu is the respiratory virus. this one you get by touching sur tpaes, eac surfaces, touching food, you need to stay away from people when you're actually sick with this. bill: keep the fingertips out of your eyes. you see people doing that, that is
kerry would be a very effect t*eu secretary of state because he could carry out president obama's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to te
ol skr*eus tha anesthesiologist that puts people to sleep and wakes them up for a living. they say consolidation is very important and it happens while we are sleeping. what is it? >> husbands can now use this as an excuse as to why they forgot to take the trash out because they didn't get a good night sleep. whaoeufpl we are sleeping the brain is working and it's working on over time to consolidate memories. what this means is that things that we encounter during the day, conscious or subconscious they get processed in networks or frame works within the brain. they get sorted based upon some common patterns and they also get stored and downloaded, similar to when you back up your computers. it's a process that will store all the memory that you need to have. jaime: let's say you're not a good sleeper. >> absolutely. jaime: how bad a shape are you in, then? jaime: what they've been showing is that the brain basically functions on delta waives during deep sleep and normally right now when we're talking we are having alpha and beta waves which are fast low voltage waves. when you get
this issue, but think about the health care system that would work for the e.u. but the closer model in the health care system that works for the netherlands. that's a thinking one of our larger state, adopting it. so it is recognizing we've taken one step in terms of expanding coverage. we are still struggling with how to get a more efficient outcome orient to health care system and it's going to take a lot of changes over the next decade or two decades. we've been having these discussions in medicare since its inception, which is now roughly 50 years. this is not going to get salt because one piece of legislation was passed. health care reform 1.0. hang on, the rest is coming the next decade or two. >> dr. ginsberg. >> in our history we've had in this country that cannot health systems abroad because of ideology. msp terrible if it's not ours. i think what is happening is we've identified a whole range of more technical issues come you know, how to pay organizations, individual providers, how to engage patients that can cross boards. i think that there's an opening to learn more fr
emergency summit is under way amid efforts to establish -- to stabilize the eu. anti-austerity protest are spreading across europe. there are reports of street violence and some looting. leaders are calling for action to restore european economic confidence. at stake is the future of the eyuro currency. a breaking story from the united states. in mountain way, and major bridge has collapsed. there was no apparent warning when the aging steel gave way during the morning commute. at least 10 vehicles of passengers plunged into the river. rescue teams have been dispatched. >> mayor, this is terrible because mountain way is not far from you. your phones are ringing before this is even over. would you have been told crabs to buy the debt. five of those cars were from a wedding party and the bride was from your city. james follows, you wrote the article several months ago. what is the story? >> there are all the tragedy in the short term of what happened to these people. then the larger story is what we have learned for the city, state, country. we recognized in telling the stories that the
total of all of your votes refusing to sign a letter to the eu, asking has a lot to be designated as a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to designate the iranian revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, being one of two to vote against sanctions this body was trying to impose on iran, the statements you have made about palestinians and the jewish lobby -- all of that together, that the image you have created is one of sending the worst possible signal to our enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> no, i would not agree with that because i have taken actions and made statements very clear as to what i believe hezbollah and hamas are as terrorist organizations. >> if there was a vote on the floor of the senate this afternoon to label the iranian national -- revolutionary guard, the people that killed soldiers in iraq, some of the most vicious people to the people of iran themselves, if there was a vote would you still vote no? >> i would want to know from the president what they were doing. ask i mean you read the paper, you w
organization by the united states and in 2006 he was only one of only 12 senators who refused to write the eu asking them to declare hezbollah a terrorist organization. why did he do that? >> chuck hagel is his own man. he wears no man's collar and he will continue to be his own man. that is the kind of person you want as secretary of state, when you're in the room deciding about war and peace. you want somebody to give their honest opinion. chuck hagel's opinions can come out in the hearings and the american people can decide. there's no question about the fact that the senate i think will ultimately confirm by an overwhelming majority chuck hagel as secretary of defense because nobody is going to really seriously consider violating the president's choice here in the middle of a war, in the middle of a shooting war. >> senator cleland, it's good to see you. thank you so much for joining us. >> thank you. >>> on monday the president said his cia nominee, john brennan, helped him create the strategy that has devastated the leadership of al qaeda. senior correspondent john m
saying eu commission, the european union body is basically saying no-go with the deal. it was sproefd to close towards the end of the last year. obviously, hasn't happened. today you can see the shares down 40%. this company is going to need a new ceo, a new strategic vision. and its biggest shareholder down about .3% on the news. fedex declined to comment this morning. now let's turn our attention briefly to this. it gives us a sense of this mentality of the crisis being over, that it's kind of gripped investors to keep hearing the bullish comments we have on people in the program. spain's ten-year still below 5% even though we're seeing prices down this morning and the yield for the ten-year in italy down 4.2. quick look at the euro/dollar which is benefiting here and has been doing pretty well of late. 1.3359. adding another .1%. just for joe, i'm going to skip talking about the yen today and that's in part because the nikkei is closed. back to you guys. >> i thought you were going to reference your -- is that a golden -- were you at the gold b globes? that looks like you paid some
about it. the laws differ in europe and in the u.s. the european process is a finding sort of at the eu level, and we've been under investigation for almost two years by the commissioner they are and his staff. and during this period, they get comments from everybody and we give them literally millions of documents. we have not come and we're busy negotiating with them. we don't think we violated any european laws, but we're happy to have a conversation and we're sort of now waiting on what they decide to do. we have been negotiating back and forth, and they announced that publicly. in the united states, the law is similar but different in the way it is applied to in our case the government decided to have the federal trade commission look at this and similar investigations are underway. there's a similar hearing. i testified at the hearings but again, i don't see the consumer arm under section two, and we've asked the government to come back and give us examples of things which are violation of law. we haven't seen that yet. we are also in negotiations with them. so i'll would say we t
at the e.u. level. we have been for investigation for it almost two years by the commissioner there and his staff. during this period, they comment from everybody and we give them literally millions of documents. we are busy negotiating with them. we don't think we violated any european laws, but we're happy to have the conversation and 're sort of now waiting on with a they decide to do. we have been negotiating back and forth and they have announced that publicly. in the united states, the law is similar but different if the way it's applied. in our indication, the government to have the federal trade commission look at this and a similar investigation is underway. there were a sers of hearings. i testified at the hearings and, again, i don't see the consumer arm under section 2 and we have asked the government to come back and give us the examples of things which are violations of law. we haven't seen that yet we are also in negotiations with them. that's probably all i should y. what i would say is we talk to these people a lot. we're waiting on them at some level. the ideal scenarioou
. -- that our current immigration system is not working effectively, indeed is 235eu8ing 0en 00 -- indeed is failing ton a daily basis cannot be denied. it needs to be fixed. it is a challenge for us to do so and will not be easy. i would, however, warn my colleagues that a framework is not a bill. and in 2006 and 2007 with the full support of the republican president of the united states, a bipartisan committee announced with great confidence that they had a plan that was going to fix our immigration system and we were all just going to line upped and vote for it much the masters of the universe had decided -- they'd meat in secret, they had all the special interest groups gather and they had worked out a plan that was going to change our immigration system for the better and we should all be most grateful. it came up with 2006, it did not pass. it came back again in 2007 with even more emphasis, and it failed coul loss -- and it failed colossally. it did not do it what they said it would do. it did not end the illegality. it did not set forth a proper principle of immigration for amer
and should 34r5eu a role in incentivizing that process and ensuring that election improvements are made to last. it can help states move forward in using available technology and ensure states do a better job at enforcing laws that are already on the books. the national voter registration act commonly known as the motor voter law requires states to allow voters to register when they renew their license at the dmv or other governmental agencies. yet there are allegations that some states aren't fulfilling their obligations under this act. blue states, red states, purple states all across the country in talking with elections administrators from around the country it's clear to me that compliance with existing law is not complete. so we have to do more to ensure voters are afforded the rights given to them under current law and that state agencies are doing what's required to simplify the registration process, to maintain uniform an nondiscriminatory voartd rolls and to provide wide straight ahead -- widespread registration opportunities. enforcing existing laws is part of the conclusion
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)